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Tales of an Elementary School Librarian

#ukulelesongFriday There’s a Hole in the Bottom of the Sea

frog

This is a song that I did a cappella for a while with my felt board set. I guess I thought it would be hard to put the felt pieces on while holding the ukulele at the same time. Then I tried it, and it wasn’t that hard at all. I just stopped playing for a sec, put the new piece on, and continued playing. (I tend to make things more complicated then they really are) I also like to get the kids to guess what’s coming next. “Who remembers what was sitting on the bump on the log?”

It’s a pretty easy felt set to make. The only tricky thing was the frog, and I just googled “cartoon frog” and found one that I liked and copied it. As you can see, it’s not perfect. The hole really isn’t that round and the flea is weird looking, but it’s so small, it’s kind of hard to notice. 🙂

felt

Here are the chords:

G                                    D
There’s a hole in the bottom of the sea

D                                                            G
There’s a hole in the bottom of the sea

C                                           G
There’s a hole in the sea, there’s a hole in the sea

D                                        G
There’s a hole in the bottom of the sea.

G                                                                                 D
There’s a log in the hole in the bottom of the sea

D                                                                               G
There’s a log in the hole in the bottom of the sea

C                                         G
There’s a hole in the sea, there’s a hole in the sea

D                                        G
There’s a hole in the bottom of the sea.

It just goes on like that, adding things (the log, the bump, the frog, the wart, the hair and the flea.)

Here is the video:

I hope someone out there can use it. Happy uking!

Previous #ukulelesiongFriday songs:

Elephant Song (original)

Bumping up and Down in my Little Red Wagon

Ants on the Ground (original) 

Bop Till You Drop

The Hokey Pokey

Brush Your Teeth

The Silly Dance Contest

Shake My Sillies Out

Hands are For Clapping

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#ukulelesongFriday Elephant Song

elephant

This week I’m sharing another original. There’s really not that much too it, really. I kind of accidentally “wrote” it while messing around playing for my kids, and they loved it. They started singing it all the time, and asking me to play it all the time, so I did.

Reluctantly, (I wasn’t all that impressed with the song), because she begged, I agreed to do it for my daughter’s preschool class at story time and it went over well. The kids all liked it much more than I did at first.

Basically, they stomp around the library rug like elephants, and when it’s time to trumpet, they stop, put their arms in the air like trunks and pretend to trumpet. Then they start marching again.

Here’s the video.

And here are the chords.

C                C         F            G
Elephant Song! Stomp! Stomp!  (x 4)

Am             Em7
Now Trumpet! Trumpet! (x2)

Like I said, not much too it. I hope you like it, and someone out there can use it. It’s kind of fun.

Here are the previous #ukulelesongFridays for all of the new people.

Bumping up and Down in my Little Red Wagon

Ants on the Ground (original) 

Bop Till You Drop

The Hokey Pokey

Brush Your Teeth

The Silly Dance Contest

Shake My Sillies Out

Hands are For Clapping

Story Time with Mr. Martin: Let’s Sing a Lullaby With Brave Cowboy

I’ll be honest. My family is in the middle of a huge move right now, and I don’t have a lot of time to think of new ideas for fun blog posts. Hopefully, you can enjoy this: me reading one of my favorites. I’ve said it before. Jan Thomas is one of the most underrated authors/illustrators out there. She’s one of the best.

#ukulelesongFriday Bumping up and Down in My Little Red Wagon/All the Small Things mashup

bumping 2

I’ve always really liked Raffi’s “Bumping up and Down in my Little Red Wagon.” It’s a simple two-chord song, and the kids love doing the motions with the bumping, the hammering and all that.

The problem for me was that I’ve been doing it for a few years, and I had grown a little bored with it. Also, it’s not really as long as the other songs I usually do, so it didn’t eat up as much of my story time as I wanted. Eventually, it fell out of my song rotation. There was always a song I hadn’t done in a while that I wanted to do more.

Well, I was singing it to my 18 month old daughter the other day, while getting her dressed, but I had Blink 182’s “All the Small Things” stuck in my head. After the first verse of “Bumping”, I went right into “Na na na na na na na na na.” I kind of liked the way the songs fit together, so I played around with it, and now I have a fresh new version of it for story time. It’s a little longer now, and I’m having fun playing it. From my experience, when I’m having more fun, the kids enjoy it more as well.

Of course, if you don’t like the Blink 182 stuff I added, you can still use the chords for just the verses. It’s a great song, either way.

Ok, for those of you who have never seen it done before, during the “bumping” verse, the kids bump up and down. During the “one wheel’s off” verse, they lean one way, and then the other, and during the “hammer” verse, they make a hammering motion. It’s pretty simple.

Here’s the video. We had to get it done in one take, so it’s kinda rough, but we’re in the middle of moving. Things are crazy around here.

Here are the chords:

G
Bumping up and down in my little red wagon
D
Bumping up and down in my little red wagon
G
Bumping up and down in my little red wagon
D                             G
Won’t you by my darling

G
Na na na na na na na na
D                      C
Na na na na Na na na na
G
Na na na na na na na na
D                     C
Na na na na Na na na na

G C Em D X2

G
One wheel’s off and the axel’s broken
D
One wheel’s off and the axel’s broken
G
One wheel’s off and the axel’s broken
D                              G
Won’t you by my darling

G
Na na na na na na na na
D                      C
Na na na na Na na na na
G
Na na na na na na na na
D                       C
Na na na na Na na na na

G C Em D X2

G
Grandma’s gonna fix it with her hammer
D
Grandma’s gonna fix it with her hammer
G
Grandma’s gonna fix it with her hammer
D                             G
Won’t you by my darling

G
Na na na na na na na na
D                     C
Na na na na Na na na na
G
Na na na na na na na na
D                    C
Na na na na Na na na na

G C Em D X2

G
Bumping up and down in my little red wagon
D
Bumping up and down in my little red wagon
G
Bumping up and down in my little red wagon
D                             G
Won’t you by my darling

G
Na na na na na na na na
D                      C
Na na na na Na na na na
G
Na na na na na na na na
D                      C
Na na na na Na na na na

End on G

As always, guys, I hope someone out there can use this version for your story times. I know it’s not for everyone, but it fits what I like to do, so maybe it will work for someone else as well!

Conspiracy Theory: Is there a hidden message in these kids’ books?

Unintentionally, I was reading three different books about being sick to three different grades, recently.

There was BobNot Bob, which I was reading to 2nd grade

Bob1

Get Well, Good Knight, which was I reading to a class of three year olds

Get Well

and Pigs Make me Sneeze, which I was reading to kindergarten.

sneeze

I don’t know why I’ve never picked up on this before (All three of these books are really good, and I’ve read them all many times), but they all end exactly the same way.

The character who was sick (they all three have cold-like symptoms, although, Gerald was the only one officially diagnosed by a practicing doctor cat) has passed the sickness on to a different character, who was trying to help.

Bob2

getwell2

swine

Now, why would all three authors end the book the same way (besides the fact that getting someone else sick is kind of funny?) I offer you this thought. It’s a conspiracy.

There is a secret society of authors working together to send a subliminal message to kids. The message is “STOP SPREADING YOUR GERMS.”

I know, I know, it may seem far-fetched, but how many authors have gone to visit a school or a bookstore for a signing, and come back with a cold? Probably a lot, I bet, and in order to try to keep this from happening, authors have been subtly dropping hints in their books for years. Your germs are contagiousWash your hands before you shake mine. Maybe stay home and don’t come to my event if you have strep. 

Most kid lit people are much too polite to say this out loud, that’s why they have to resort to subliminal messages. They probably thought they would get away with it, too. But I’m on to you, guys. You can’t trick our children into not sharing their germs with you any longer.

March’s most checked out

March was a short month because of Spring Break, but my students did a LOT of reading. Here are the books they checked out the most.

#1 Arnie the Doughnut: The Invasion of the UFOnuts

arnie ufo

If you’ve been following this blog over the few weeks, you get why this was checked out the most.

#2. I Will Surprise my Friend

surprise

#3. Sisters

sisters

I was just telling someone yesterday that Raina is royalty in this school.

#4. Warriors: The Lost Warrior

warriors

The Warriors books, the graphic novels and the regular novels have been highly popular this year. My students have even gotten me to read a few of them.

#5. Wrinkle in Time

wrinkle

Here’s the Hollywood effect for you. This one is kind of funny. This book has been checked out so much this month, and then kids will bring it back the next day saying, “This books is too weird.” I’ve gotten a few to stick with it, though. We’ll see what they think about it.

#6. Pigs Make me Sneeze

sneeze

#7. Captain Underpants and the Big, Bad Battle of the Bionic Booger Boy

220px-Nasty_Nostril_Nuggets

#8. Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Old School

oldschool

#9. We are in a Book

weareinabook

#10. Naked!

naked!

Before you mail that giant doughnut costume back

Sometimes when you host an author visit, you find yourself in possession of an awesome doughnut costume for a few days. You should probably box it up, and put it aside until you can mail it back. Or….you could….have some fun with it.

#ukulelesongFriday Ants on the Ground

header photo

I’m excited and a little nervous to share this one with you. I’m nervous because it’s the first #ukulelesongFriday in which I’m sharing an original song. Not only that, but it’s the first motion song that I’ve ever written for library story times. I hope you like it. I’m a tough critic of my own stuff, and I really do have fun playing this one. I’ll admit it.

I played it this week for my preschool classes and it went really well, exactly like I hoped and imagined. The kids really got into the motions and guessing what the next “creature” was going to be.

It’s probably pretty easy to figure this out from the video, but here are the motions. I keep the kids seated for this song.

The ants part: they all stomp their feet in front of them.

The skeeters part: The kids clap their hands together like they are squashing mosquitos.

The caterpillars part: They shake their heads back and forth really fast.

The kitty part: They pet imaginary cats in their laps.  (my students have some awesome purring impersonations. It was hard to keep a straight face.)

The tempo changes back and forth a lot in the song. It’s slower during the verses and a good deal faster during the chorus when the kids are doing the motions. Except for the kitty part. It’s the same tempo as the verses.

You could probably have gotten all of that from the video without me spelling it out, but I try to be thorough, just in case.

And here are the chords:

Ants on the Ground

Intro: GC GD GC GDC

G                                                       C
I was walking in my backyard just the other day
G                                                           D
When I noticed some hills of dirt in my way.
G                                                        C
I kicked a dirt mound and then gave a shout
G                                   D                  G
As a million billion ants came crawling, crawling out

G                                    C
Ants on the ground, ants on the ground
G                                      D
Help me stomp these ants on the ground
G                                                                       C
They’re crawling on my shoes, they’re crawling all around
G                         D                  G
Stomp, stomp stomp these ants on the ground.

Stomp ‘em!
GC GD GC GDG

G                                                    C
Phew! The ants all went back inside their holes
G                                               D
I thought that I had things under control.
G                                             C
Then suddenly I cried out in alarm
G                                 D              G
When an itty, bitty insect bit me in the arm
Bzzzzzzzzz

G                                C
Skeeters in the air, skeeters in the air
G                                  D
Help me slap these skeeters in the air
G                                                               C
They’re buzzing in my ears, they’re buzzing everywhere
G               D                G
Slap slap slap these skeeters in the air

Slap ‘em!
GC GD GC GDG

G                                            C
Worn out and tired from all of that slapping
G                                                 D
I thought that I could some afternoon napping
G                                     C
I sat down beneath a willow tree
G                                             D                   G
But then I felt something wiggling all over me

G                                         C
Caterpillars in my hair, caterpillars in my hair
G                                                       D
I gotta shake these caterpillars from my hair
G                                                                   C
They’re crawling up my nose, they’re crawling everywhere.
G                                   D                 G
I gotta shake these caterpillars from my hair

Shake ‘em out!
GC GD GC GDG

G                                                    C
The caterpillars crawled back into their tree
G                                                  D
I smiled to myself and said “Finally!
G                                            C
I can get some peace and take my nap
G                                        D                       G
But then a little furry critter crawled into my lap.
Meow

G                           C
Kitty in my lap, kitty in my lap
G                           D
I love to pet this kitty in my lap.
G                                                     C
She’s the perfect friend for an afternoon nap
G              D            G
I love to pet this kitty in my lap

(purring sound) GC GD GC GDG

That’s it! If you’re reading this and you like it, you have my permission to play this song for any group of kids you want. Let me know if you use it, and how it went. That would make me happy!

Happy uking!

Do-nut underestimate the power of a great author visit

We had our big yearly author visit yesterday, and it was amazing. Simply awesome. Laurie Keller puts on a great visit, guys.

I’ve been hearing back from kids all day about how great it was and how they have been creating their own stories and characters since then. Some kids have even brought me their own illustrated stories. I’m a happy librarian.

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